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November 01, 2010
I had the opportunity to meet Mickey Mantle at a book signing. When I told him that my father had seen him hit a grand slam against Brooklyn in the 1953 World Series, Mantle grinned and said, "That was fun." As for Frank Gifford's comments in The Mick (Oct. 11) that Mantle did little to help society, I'll settle for that moment and memories of him patrolling centerfield at Yankee Stadium.
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November 01, 2010

Letters

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I had the opportunity to meet Mickey Mantle at a book signing. When I told him that my father had seen him hit a grand slam against Brooklyn in the 1953 World Series, Mantle grinned and said, "That was fun." As for Frank Gifford's comments in The Mick (Oct. 11) that Mantle did little to help society, I'll settle for that moment and memories of him patrolling centerfield at Yankee Stadium.

James F. Pearn Jr., Dayton

It was interesting to read about Mantle and the Yankees of 1957 and how the media turned their backs on his indiscretions and those of many of his famous teammates. Didn't the same thing happen during major league baseball's steroid era? Isn't it happening now with the use of HGH?

Rob Picciotto, Brooklyn

After reading The Mick, I can't help but compare Mickey Mantle and Tiger Woods. While Mantle is fondly remembered as "the Last Boy in the last decade ruled by boys," Woods is seen as a sex addict. While I in no way condone the choices that Tiger has made, I find the discrepancy in how they are perceived and portrayed intriguing.

Dave Kirk, Toronto

Déjà Vu

The cover picture of David Price blowing an oversized pink bubble seemed very familiar to me (Turn Up the Heat, Oct. 11). I rummaged through my childhood collection and quickly found Ken Griffey Jr.'s 1995 Pinnacle baseball card. The similarities between the pictures go beyond their love of gum: In homage to a style Griffey made popular, Price is also wearing his hat backward. I hope that Price continues to blossom as a player and continues to get kids excited about the game for which Griffey served as an ambassador during his 20-year career.

Akiva Wolk, Teaneck, N.J.

I enjoyed the article on Price and also the companion piece on Aroldis Chapman, the Reds' rookie pitcher from Cuba. What caught my eye was the huge difference in the amount of money each player signed for. Price's deal is worth $11.25 million over six years, while Chapman, as an international free agent, got $30 million for six years. Chapman's contract is even more than Stephen Strasburg's "record" $15 million deal for four years that created such a stir in Washington. That doesn't seem fair.

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