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IRON GIANTS
AUSTIN MURPHY
January 20, 2011
IN THE RIVALRY'S MOST THRILLING EPISODE YET, THE TIGERS LET THEIR PLAY DO THE TALKING
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January 20, 2011

Iron Giants

IN THE RIVALRY'S MOST THRILLING EPISODE YET, THE TIGERS LET THEIR PLAY DO THE TALKING

From SPORTS ILLUSTRATED, December 6, 2010

FIRST, AN IRON BOWL PRIMER: FOR DECADES THE UNIVERSITY OF Alabama has been held up as the state's flagship school, where the professionals—its doctors and lawyers and captains of industry—sent their children. Auburn, né the Agricultural and Mechanical College of Alabama, drew from a more middle- and lower-class pool. Yet there was nothing genteel or civil about the Crimson Tide's welcome for Tigers quarterback Cam Newton in Bryant-Denny Stadium for the 75th edition of this intrastate face-off. (If they'd gone easy on him, of course, this wouldn't have been the Iron Bowl.) $CAM NEWTON T-shirts sold briskly. Stepping onto the field for warmups, Newton was greeted by the Steve Miller Band's Take the Money and Run, followed by Dusty Springfield's Son of a Preacher Man.

By the end of the game, of course, most of the junior's critics had fallen silent. Just before disappearing into the tunnel, Auburn defensive tackle Nick Fairley surveyed a cluster of Crimson-clad fans and baited them, cupping his hands to both ears as if to say, "I can't hear you!"

And what to make of Newton's own gesture only moments before? In a game fraught with Heisman and national-title implications, the Tigers had just completed a 28—27 win and the most dramatic comeback in the history of the rivalry. After midfield embraces with teammates and opponents alike—"Good game, big dog," said one 'Bama player. "You're the best player in the country"—Newton bolted toward the flash mob of Tigers fans in a corner of Bryant-Denny, stopping along the way to perform a kind of flying hip bump with Fairley. Newton then embarked on a clockwise victory lap, theatrically holding one hand over his mouth as he did so.

Was he mocking the Tide faithful for their silence? Was it Newton's way of signaling that he'd been gagged by Auburn coach Gene Chizik? Was he about to throw up?

No one knows; Newton didn't speak with reporters after the game. Despite his natural exuberance, he hasn't spoken publicly since Nov. 9, as a series of accusations have buffeted him and the Tigers' football program. They include allegations that his father, Cecil, a pastor in Newnan, Ga., solicited up to $180,000 from Mississippi State in a pay-for-play scheme last year. (The elder Newton has denied any wrongdoing, and Auburn stands by its quarterback.)

Against this tawdry backdrop, the most intriguing matchup of the 2010 regular season kicked off. To get to the BCS title game, the No. 2 Tigers, led by their Heisman Trophy front-runner, would have to get past the defending national champions, led by tailback Mark Ingram, the 2009 Heisman winner.

During the first half No. 9 Alabama embarrassed the visitors, jumping to a 24—0 lead midway through the second quarter. "We were on the verge of being terrible," said offensive coordinator Gus Malzahn, "but [we] came back in the second half and played fairly solid football."

Two profound understatements. The Tigers didn't verge on terrible in the first half. They embodied it. The Tide was up 21--nil before Auburn mustered a single first down. And it wasn't "fairly solid" in the second half. It was astonishing.

What were Alabama's defenders doing early in the game to stifle the visitors? "They were whipping our butts, is what they were doing early," explained Malzahn. 'Bama took away the inside runs that have been Newton's bread and butter this season. Bowing to this reality, Malzahn decided to attack Alabama's perimeter in the second half, moving the chains with quick passes to, and sweeps by, sophomore tailback Onterio McCalebb.

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