SI Vault
 
THE SAVIOR COMETH
Lee Jenkins
February 14, 2011
Amar'e Stoudemire wanted a team he could call his own, so he went the one place his free-agent brethren avoided: New York. Now he's the toast of the town
Decrease font Decrease font
Enlarge font Enlarge font
February 14, 2011

The Savior Cometh

Amar'e Stoudemire wanted a team he could call his own, so he went the one place his free-agent brethren avoided: New York. Now he's the toast of the town

View CoverRead All Articles
1 2 3

The way Stoudemire charted his own journey makes his teammates believe he can captain theirs. He talks regularly with his mom, who lives in Phoenix and has started a street ministry; his older brother, Hazell Jr., who lives in Florida and is looking for work; and his younger brother, Marwan, who is serving 9½ years in prison for conspiracy to commit armed robbery. "I can call him about once a month," Stoudemire says. "I try not to get too emotional on the phone."

Stoudemire is single but has three children who live with their mother in Phoenix and visit him in New York. They have rooms in the apartment and are getting a minihoop for the hallway. They make Stoudemire think of his own father, and how enduring their short time together was. He believes Hazell's example kept him out of trouble when so many around him succumbed. He flashes back to those last words—"The skies are the limit for you"—as he sits over Manhattan. The city is spread out around him. Snow falls on his front yard.

Now on SI.com

For more pro basketball coverage from Lee Jenkins, go to SI.com/nba

1 2 3