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April 25, 2011
Although I'm a die-hard Dodgers fan, I'm not afraid to admit that the numbers put up by the Phillies' starting pitching rotation are scary enough to make the best hitters in the majors cringe. But it wasn't until I saw all of them on SI's cover, threatening me with that "I dare you to try and get a hit off of me" look, that I was able to appreciate how spooked National League batters should be.
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April 25, 2011

Letters

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Although I'm a die-hard Dodgers fan, I'm not afraid to admit that the numbers put up by the Phillies' starting pitching rotation are scary enough to make the best hitters in the majors cringe. But it wasn't until I saw all of them on SI's cover, threatening me with that "I dare you to try and get a hit off of me" look, that I was able to appreciate how spooked National League batters should be.

Nathan Sanchez, Bakersfield

For reprints of SI covers visit SIcovers.com

While Philadelphia certainly has a remarkable pitching staff (The Legion of Arms, April 4), I'm highly disappointed that the real gunslingers of the 2010 season, the Giants, weren't featured on the cover of your baseball preview. Tim Lincecum, Jonathan Sanchez, Matt Cain and Madison Bumgarner carried San Francisco to the World Series championship—after they whipped the Phillies for the NL pennant.

Steve Luthman, Chicago

Sure the Phillies' pitchers make a great story, but baseball fans would be remiss to forget the Orioles' amazing rotation from 1971. With Mike Cuellar, Pat Dobson, Dave McNally and Jim Palmer on the mound, Baltimore was only the second team in baseball after the 1920 White Sox to have four pitchers win at least 20 games during the same season. No other foursome has done it since.

Dennis Hurwitz

Corona Del Mar, Calif.

For so many years I watched as other clubs spent big bucks to get key free agents and big-name players in their lineups to win championships, while the Phillies wallowed in futility, eventually setting the record for most losses by a sports franchise, topping the 10,000 mark in 2007. It is finally the Phillies' turn, and the character of these five starting pitchers makes it that much more enjoyable to watch.

David Helfand

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