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THE QUARTERBACK QUANDARY
Peter King
April 25, 2011
Despite an explosion in information available to teams over the past two decades—scouting, video, workouts, tests, interviews—picking a franchise quarterback out of the pack remains pro football's toughest call
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April 25, 2011

The Quarterback Quandary

Despite an explosion in information available to teams over the past two decades—scouting, video, workouts, tests, interviews—picking a franchise quarterback out of the pack remains pro football's toughest call

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Then the coaches told him they wanted to see how he'd handle certain off-field situations, like a receiver who thinks he's not getting the ball enough (hmmm: Brandon Marshall?) and storms into a meeting room. Daboll then burst through the door, playing the part. "He was yelling at me pretty loud about not getting the ball," Dalton says. "I said, 'I'll take a look at that.... All right, all right!' I don't think I handled that too well, but I know I can when it happens. But the situation was a little weird."

When you talk to teams with big interest in Dalton—Cincinnati, San Francisco, Tennessee, Minnesota, Indianapolis (coach Jim Caldwell, coordinator Clyde Christensen and G.M. Chris Polian flew to Fort Worth to work him out)—you hear about his aptitude and experience. Dalton had 49 starts at TCU and may be able to adapt to a new offense quickly—important in a year when teams will have to get new players ready on the fly if the work stoppage stretches through the summer.

At least one team is thinking not just about Dalton's brains but also about what's on top of them. "Has there ever been a red-headed quarterback in the NFL who's really done well?" a coach asked one reporter last week. "It sounds idiotic, but is there any way that could be a factor? We've wondered."

Doubt it, Coach. But check if there's some extra money in the budget for a hair color consultant.

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