SI Vault
 
Golden Oldie
CHRIS MANNIX
May 30, 2011
At the record age of 46, a revived (and aggressive!) Bernard Hopkins took the light heavyweight title
Decrease font Decrease font
Enlarge font Enlarge font
May 30, 2011

Golden Oldie

At the record age of 46, a revived (and aggressive!) Bernard Hopkins took the light heavyweight title

View CoverRead All Articles

Father Time is a fighter's most unforgiving opponent, one that will beat you down (Oscar De La Hoya) or deliver years of punishment when your skills fade (Roy Jones Jr.). Its record is unblemished, though against Bernard Hopkins it's being forced to go the distance. Last Saturday night in Montreal, Hopkins, 46, defeated Jean Pascal by unanimous decision to win the WBC light heavyweight championship and surpass George Foreman as the oldest man to claim a world title. It was bell-to-bell brilliance from Hopkins, who wobbled Pascal in the third round and outlanded (131 to 70, according to CompuBox) a man 18 years his junior. "He has a lot of tricks," says Pascal. "He's a great champion."

His peers long gone or faded, Hopkins (52-5-2) continues to fight like a man in his prime. His secret, he says, is simple: clean living. Hopkins doesn't smoke, drink or ingest anything unhealthy. He keeps a steady weight—in 23 years he has put on just 15 pounds—and works so hard that his trainers often have to slow him down. "You can't hustle boxing," says Hopkins. "You don't work, it will finish you." Always a showman (he dropped to do a few pushups before the seventh round), in the twilight of his career Hopkins has replaced his slick, defense-first style with a more aggressive approach, determined to mix it up. "I'm going to keep fighting like this until I leave this game," he says. "I'm going to give everyone some shows."

Now that would be something. Hopkins has a master's degree in tactics (he watches hundreds of hours of video and has an encyclopedic knowledge of opponents' tendencies) and a Ph.D. in head games. "Four-round fighter" was how Hopkins described Pascal; at the post-fight press conference a battered Pascal defiantly declared he had proven that he wasn't. Maybe not. But neither was he—nor is anyone else in the sport—a match for Hopkins's craft and experience. "Sometimes I have been boring," admits Hopkins. "But I'm bringing back old-school boxing. You haven't seen anything yet."

Hopkins once promised his mother he wouldn't fight past 40. Now, in what can only be good news for a sport starved for stars, he says he hopes to fight until he's 50. He is contracted to make his first title defense against Chad Dawson later this year and is eyeing super middleweight champion Lucian Bute and the winner of Showtime's Super Six tournament in 2012. Father Time will keep coming, but Hopkins won't stop punching back.

Now on SI.com

For more fight coverage, including Chris Mannix's Inside Boxing, go to SI.com/boxing

1