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DEEP IN THE HEART OF THE CITY
LEIGH MONTVILLE
June 06, 2011
FOUR DECADES AFTER THE BLUE-COLLAR BRUINS STITCHED THEMSELVES INTO THE FABRIC OF BOSTON, A NEW GENERATION OF PLAYERS IS CHASING THE STANLEY CUP, AND FINDING OUT WHAT IT REALLY MEANS TO BE THE HOME TEAM
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June 06, 2011

Deep In The Heart Of The City

FOUR DECADES AFTER THE BLUE-COLLAR BRUINS STITCHED THEMSELVES INTO THE FABRIC OF BOSTON, A NEW GENERATION OF PLAYERS IS CHASING THE STANLEY CUP, AND FINDING OUT WHAT IT REALLY MEANS TO BE THE HOME TEAM

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"My two tickets are next to the glass, and they're $522 apiece," Heather Steadman said. "I'm not going. It's too much. I haven't gone to any of the playoff games. I'll go again next season."

There will be at least one constant, at least one bridge in the Bruins' organization between the last good times and the present good times. That would be the opera singer who didn't know anything about hockey, didn't know where the Garden was located. Rene Rancourt is still the singer of the national anthem 35 years later.

"You can tell when the big games arrive," he said, familiar now with the job, familiar with the nuances. "You can feel the excitement when you go onto the ice. People tend to sing along for the big games. It used to bother me when they did that. If everyone else is singing, why do they need me? But now I'm fine with it. The big games, the last chorus, all you can hear are the people singing at the end."

Standing ovations for eating pizza. Singing for the national anthem.

Back to the Boston Bruins' future.

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