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STANLEY CUP FINALS A FANTASTIC JOURNEY
SARAH KWAK
June 17, 2011
RALLYING FROM A TWO-GAME HOLE AND INSPIRED BY AN INJURED TEAMMATE, THE BRUINS BULLED PAST THE CANUCKS TO WIN IN SEVEN GAMES
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June 17, 2011

Stanley Cup Finals A Fantastic Journey

RALLYING FROM A TWO-GAME HOLE AND INSPIRED BY AN INJURED TEAMMATE, THE BRUINS BULLED PAST THE CANUCKS TO WIN IN SEVEN GAMES

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The Bruins did take some positives from another heart-ripping defeat. Their power play, which had struggled mightily all postseason, produced after Julien moved Chara from the top of the crease back to the point. During a second-period man advantage, the defenseman flung a shot that forward Mark Recchi was able to tip in as he streaked across the slot. It was the 43-year-old winger's first goal since Game 1 of the series against Philadelphia and only the sixth power-play goal of the postseason for the team.

When asked if he thought his goal would answer the naysayers who said he was too old, Recchi fired back, "The critics can kiss my ass."

Better that, perhaps, than a bite on the glove.

GAME 3 June 6, TD Garden

Bruins 8, Canucks 1

JUST FIVE MINUTES INTO THE GAME A PALL HAD BEEN cast over the arena. Near center ice Bruins winger Nathan Horton lay motionless after absorbing a devastating—and late—hit by Canucks defenseman Aaron Rome. Horton had taken a couple of strides after passing the puck to linemate Milan Lucic in the neutral zone when the 6' 1", 218-pound Rome stepped into him at the blue line, putting his shoulder into the side of Horton's head.

As he lay on the ice, Horton was oblivious to the boos that rained down on Rome. And because he was taken to Massachusetts General Hospital, where he was diagnosed with a severe concussion, Horton missed the cheers that resounded in the Garden during the second period when the Bruins took it to the Canucks, scoring four goals on their way to a whopping win.

"We talked about it [during the first intermission]," Boston defenseman Dennis Seidenberg said. "Coach said, 'Let's go out there and do it for Horty.' Nobody wants to see a guy down on the ice with his eyes rolled in the back of his head. It's a good feeling that we ended up winning this game for him."

At first the images of Horton going down were hard to shake. The Bruins failed to cash in on the ensuing five-minute power play and then didn't put a single shot on Luongo for the rest of the period. While Boston digested the situation, Thomas was eating pucks. The Bruins' goalie made 12 saves in the first period, keeping the game scoreless. Thomas finished with 40 saves in his first Stanley Cup finals win. "You have to find a way to stay focused and play the game," Chara said of Horton's absence. "The best way to get revenge is to win."

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