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PAPA BRUIN
Sarah Kwak
June 17, 2011
WINNER OF TWO AS A PLAYER AND TWO AS A G.M., MILT SCHMIDT KNOWS SOME THINGS ABOUT STANLEY CUPS
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June 17, 2011

Papa Bruin

WINNER OF TWO AS A PLAYER AND TWO AS A G.M., MILT SCHMIDT KNOWS SOME THINGS ABOUT STANLEY CUPS

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SI: After you moved to the front office, you made the famed trade with Chicago that brought Phil Esposito, Ken Hodge and Fred Stanfield to Boston. How did you pull that off?

MS: On the last day you can make a trade, the phone rang in my office and it was Tommy Ivan, the general manager of the Chicago Blackhawks. He said, "Let's make a deal. Let's name some names." So eventually, he mentioned Esposito out of the clear blue sky. And immediately I said, "What's wrong with him?" And he said, "Nothing's wrong with him except that he can't get along with our coach, Billy Reay." The player he wanted was Gilles Marotte, a defenseman. Everybody was after him. Anyway, after five hours on the phone, we had a deal. But nobody knows how deals are going to work out. Nobody knew Stanfield and Hodge and Esposito would turn out to make us Stanley Cup winners in 1970 and '72. It's amazing how hockey players make you look like either a chump or a champion.

SI: Could you tell those 1970 and '72 teams were special?

MS: Well, I thought they were special because we had a club that if you wanted to play the alley type of hockey, we could play it. And if you wanted to play like you were going to Sunday school, we could play that way as well. We had Bobby Orr out there, don't forget, and Bobby would dictate what kind of game it would be. When I mention his name, I have to say that he was the greatest hockey player I have ever, ever seen. There's no doubt about that. I just thank goodness I never had to play against him.

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