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A LEAGUE OF ITS OWN
CHRIS NASHAWATY
July 04, 2011
IT'S BEEN 22 YEARS SINCE WILD THING WALTZED INTO OUR LIVES, AND MAJOR LEAGUE STILL MAKES OUR HEARTS SING. THE FILM'S CAST AND CREW TRY TO EXPLAIN HOW IT BECAME ONE OF THE MOST BELOVED—AND MOST QUOTED—SPORTS MOVIES EVER
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July 04, 2011

A League Of Its Own

IT'S BEEN 22 YEARS SINCE WILD THING WALTZED INTO OUR LIVES, AND MAJOR LEAGUE STILL MAKES OUR HEARTS SING. THE FILM'S CAST AND CREW TRY TO EXPLAIN HOW IT BECAME ONE OF THE MOST BELOVED—AND MOST QUOTED—SPORTS MOVIES EVER

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Bernsen: Brewers pitcher Pete Vuckovich was in the movie, and he had a bar in Milwaukee that we would all go to a lot.

Uecker: Stormin' & Vuke's. Yeah, I've been there. It's a good place.

Bernsen: And you have Charlie, the ringleader. He was a chick magnet. It was the most astonishing thing any of us had ever seen. He was the Pied Piper of beautiful women.

Russo: I'm sure the guys were having a good time. Why, did you hear they were catting around?

Ward: Charlie had a lot of women flying in and out of Milwaukee. His biggest problem was trying to coordinate the airline schedule so that these women wouldn't run into each other.

Sheen: It wasn't as bad as on Young Guns [a year earlier]. We made that one in Santa Fe, and you would fly into Albuquerque and drive to Santa Fe on this two-lane highway. Literally, the girls that were leaving would pass the ones coming in. Major League was so physically demanding that you didn't have a lot of time for that. You're lying in bed and everything [hurts], and you're thinking, I have to pitch tomorrow?! But there were certain days that we'd look at the schedule for the next day and be like, "Gentlemen, tonight we ride."

V. "The postgame show is brought to you by ... Christ, I can't find it. To hell with it."

Ward: Major League opened on April 7, 1989. Opening night in L.A., the house was packed and people were cheering exactly where you'd want them to. It was amazing.

Chesser: I don't recall the reviews. I don't think they were through the roof. I think it opened at eight or nine million—a really big opening.

Ward: After a screening in Cleveland, Bob Feller told me there was too much swearing. He was upset. He said, "We don't talk like that." And I said, "Really? Did you actually dress in the locker room?" One of the things I love that came out of Major League is, before Wild Thing, relief pitchers didn't often enter to music. That was something we gave to baseball. Then [Phillies pitcher] Mitch Williams took on the nickname Wild Thing, with the song and everything. That was great.

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