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LETTERS
October 17, 2011
Isn't it ironic that the Red Sox spent $161 million building a team around the concept of sabermetrics, yet G.M. Theo Epstein and manager Terry Francona blame Boston's epic collapse not on statistics but on the lack of good old team chemistry? Where is the algorithm for that?
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October 17, 2011

Letters

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Isn't it ironic that the Red Sox spent $161 million building a team around the concept of sabermetrics, yet G.M. Theo Epstein and manager Terry Francona blame Boston's epic collapse not on statistics but on the lack of good old team chemistry? Where is the algorithm for that?

Dan Haulman, Lebanon, Pa.

I enjoyed Tom Verducci's article on how well Epstein and the Red Sox brain trust practiced the science espoused in Moneyball (The New Moneyball, Sept. 26). However, I think the real Moneyball success story is in Tampa Bay. The Rays lost their seven highest-paid players last season, had a payroll smaller than every team in the majors except the Royals, and yet they still made the playoffs.

Lee Chirgwin, Orleans, Mass.

As a recovering Rotisserie baseball addict I can appreciate statistics as much as anyone. However, the fact remains that Billy Beane's Athletics have never made it to the World Series.

Gary Wong

Rancho Palos Verdes, Calif.

Big Bear

Your article on Baylor quarterback Robert Griffin III (Back of All Trades, Sept. 26) reminded me a lot of Oregon's Darron Thomas, who rescinded his commitment to LSU after it wouldn't guarantee him a spot at quarterback. It baffles me how players who have the skills to flourish at quarterback end up going to other programs just because coaches pigeonhole them as cornerbacks or receivers. Griffin has put Baylor football back on the map. His success on and off the field is a breath of fresh air.

Ben Ingersoll, Fresno

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