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LETTERS
November 14, 2011
The chip on Jerry West's shoulder from years of emotional suffering was obviously used as motivation to prove his self-worth. Unfortunately, that same suffering has resulted in a life filled with depression. I hope West realizes that it's not a sign of weakness to seek help, but one of strength.
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November 14, 2011

Letters

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The chip on Jerry West's shoulder from years of emotional suffering was obviously used as motivation to prove his self-worth. Unfortunately, that same suffering has resulted in a life filled with depression. I hope West realizes that it's not a sign of weakness to seek help, but one of strength.

Haig Musurlian, Laguna Hills, Calif.

God bless Jerry West for having the courage to share his remarkable story (Basketball Was the Easy Part, Oct. 24). As a 61-year-old sports fan who has suffered through his share of personal trauma, I was so touched after reading your article. It truly gave me strength to continue healing.

Louis Saltzman Glen Head, N.Y.

After reading this story, I don't think West has conquered his demons. His behavior toward the restaurant manager was as abusive as his father's treatment of him. I hope before he concludes this life he finds peace.

Arturo Thurin, Bayamón, P.R.

I thought your cover headline THE COURAGE OF JERRY WEST was far too kind. Each year millions of Americans struggle with the horrors of depression. The truly courageous are those who find a way to deal with the disease without holding grudges or blaming others for their perceived failures. West, it seems, has been unable to do either.

Thomas Crosslin

Stoneham, Mass.

Forever Moore

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