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LETTERS
December 12, 2011
All good company men, whether in football or at a large corporation, are loyal to the organizations they work for and follow the directives of the executives above them. Joe Paterno is no different. As more facts emerge, I believe we will learn that the institutional failures at Penn State reach far above Paterno.
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December 12, 2011

Letters

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All good company men, whether in football or at a large corporation, are loyal to the organizations they work for and follow the directives of the executives above them. Joe Paterno is no different. As more facts emerge, I believe we will learn that the institutional failures at Penn State reach far above Paterno.

Beth Jesurun, Bryan, Texas

Penn State appears to have been more concerned about protecting its image (This Is Penn State, Nov. 21) than in doing what is right. I believe that has also been Paterno's pattern throughout his career. It seems to me that he only wanted to take responsibility for the actions of his players and coaches on the field and refused to address their potentially serious problems off it.

Steve Ferrier, Lawrence, Kans.

The failure to properly report the heinous acts that are alleged to have happened at Penn State is as shameful as the acts themselves. If we don't do whatever we can to protect our children, then what does that say about who we are?

Matt Travis, Baxter, Iowa

I think the media has used a 23-page indictment to create myriad conspiracy theories and destroy a great man like Paterno. No one can possibly say for sure how he would have responded if he were in Paterno's shoes. Paterno's admission that he wished he had done more is a sign of human decency, not an admission of any moral transgression.

Andrew Smukler

Princeton, N.J.

I agree with Jack McCallum's assertion that Paterno can't get his reputation back (A Legacy in Tatters, Nov. 21). But given everything that has happened, one has to ask: Was that reputation ever deserved in the first place? Is the Paterno we saw before this scandal the real one, or just an idealized front? I don't know the answer, but the fact that it seems appropriate to ask says a lot.

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