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THE MAIL
December 17, 2012
Tim Layden's story on Johnny Evers (Tinker to Evers to Chance ... to Me) is one of the best written and most-moving articles I have read in SPORTS ILLUSTRATED. We all have family who have passed on and whom we wish we could connect with to better understand who we are. Layden's exploration of his ancestry proved to be just as compelling as Evers's legacy.
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December 17, 2012

The Mail

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Tim Layden's story on Johnny Evers (Tinker to Evers to Chance ... to Me) is one of the best written and most-moving articles I have read in SPORTS ILLUSTRATED. We all have family who have passed on and whom we wish we could connect with to better understand who we are. Layden's exploration of his ancestry proved to be just as compelling as Evers's legacy.

Robert Aaron Greenberg, Cherry Hill, N.J.

Getting Ahead of Yourself

In Stewart Mandel's column, Selectoral College (SCORECARD), he mentions that the controversial call in the Oct. 13 Notre Dame--Stanford game in which the referee ruled that Cardinal running back Stepfan Taylor's forward progress had been stopped before he reached the end zone "cost the Cardinal a playoff spot." The truth is, even if Taylor had scored on that play, the game would have been 20--19 at best. It is unfair to assume that Stanford would have made the extra point or would have come out on top in the second overtime.

Alan Reisinger, Avon Lake, Ohio

Just for the Record

I couldn't agree more with Phil Taylor's assessment that breaking sports records has become a joke (POINT AFTER). I will never forget how disgusted I was when Brett Favre basically laid down on the field to give Michael Strahan the single-season sacks record in 2002. That brazen act rendered the record meaningless.

Jack Weiss, Wilmington, N.C.

I have always thought that there was one record in the sports books that was a bit distorted and deserved an asterisk: Cal Ripken Jr.'s consecutive games record. Ripken's streak should have ended the moment the major league baseball players went on strike on Aug. 12, 1994. The players were not locked out by the owners; rather they walked out. Since Ripken was a part of the players' association he, too, chose not to play, thus ending his consecutive-game streak.

Rick Midddleton, Carleton Place, Ont.

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