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Can't a Man Make a Living?
John Garrity
June 03, 2013
NO TOUR PLAYER WILL BE AFFECTED MORE BY THE USGA'S BAN ON ANCHORED PUTTING THAN TIM CLARK, WHOSE DISABILITY PREVENTS HIM FROM MAKING A CONVENTIONAL STROKE
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June 03, 2013

Can't A Man Make A Living?

NO TOUR PLAYER WILL BE AFFECTED MORE BY THE USGA'S BAN ON ANCHORED PUTTING THAN TIM CLARK, WHOSE DISABILITY PREVENTS HIM FROM MAKING A CONVENTIONAL STROKE

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Tim Clark has that rarest of conditions: an amusing disability. To start with, it's funny that he can't remember what it's called, even though it was first diagnosed when he was a grade-schooler in his native South Africa. "I know there's a name for it," he says. "You could look it up. Essentially what I have is zero supination in my forearms." So you look it up, and suddenly you're reading cadaver studies on "radial and ulnar deviation of the wrist" and learning more than you ever wanted to know about "intrinsic intercarpal ligaments" and "the triangular fibrocartilage complex." You can't help but chuckle.

Funnier still are the stories Clark's mates tell about his adventures at tollbooths and fast-food drive-throughs, and how he's useless at moving furniture. "It's always funny when you're standing with Tim in a food line," says 2008 Masters champ Trevor Immelman, who has witnessed his countryman's struggles to hold a plate with one hand while wielding salad tongs with the other. Want to share some M&M's with the world's 46th-ranked golfer? Pour them into a bowl.

"Silly little things are difficult for me," Clark says. "Like carrying plates. I could not be a waiter." To clarify his condition, he asks you to extend your arms with your palms facing. "Now turn your palms to the sky," he says, confident that you'll have no problem doing so. "If you think of holding a bowl of soup, that's supinating"—Clark, known for his dry wit, misses the pun—"but I can only go to here." He tilts his hands slightly outward to demonstrate the relative immobility of his forearms.

Normally we wouldn't dwell on a golfer's infirmity, but Clark's funky forearms could soon be the talk of the golf world. At 37 he is a dark-horse pick to win the U.S. Open next month at Merion, a course well suited to his anachronistic skills. But even if Clark's popgun game fails to beat Tiger Woods and the other long knockers, the unassuming 5'7" pro who calls Scottsdale, Ariz., home could find himself at the center of the biggest golf-against-golfer disability battle since PGA Tour Inc. v. Casey Martin.

The catalyst for this development is a rules change finalized last week by the USGA and the R&A, a revision popularly known as the anchored-putting ban. As of Jan. 1, 2016, Rule 14-1b will prohibit the long- and belly-putter techniques employed by four of the last six major-championship winners, including defending U.S. Open champ Webb Simpson. It will also, Clark asserts, jeopardize his career because he—unlike Adam Scott, Ernie Els or Keegan Bradley—can't simply dust off an old putter and "go short." "I can't grip the club properly if it's close to my body," Clark says, "because I don't have the means to tuck my elbows in." (Full swings are no problem because on those shots he extends his arms, palms facing each other.)

Clark had just deplaned in Texas when he got word of the USGA's decision. "By no means is it a done deal," he insisted after a long pro-am round at Fort Worth's Colonial Country Club, site of the Crowne Plaza Invitational, where he tied for seventh. "The Tour still needs to decide if it accepts the new rule," says Clark, who expects that it will ultimately be put to a vote of the players. If democracy doesn't save him, he concedes, he might have to consider a disability claim. "It's been no secret," he says, "that we've had legal counsel assisting us through all this."

It was at a players' meeting in January that Clark became the anchorers' champion. He talked for 10 minutes, challenging the arguments against anchoring, detailing his unique circumstances and speaking up for the right of tour pros to regulate their own competitions. He was not the only pro to speak against the proposed rule, but many players credit Clark for commissioner Tim Finchem's subsequent statement that the PGA Tour would join the PGA of America in opposition.

"We were all for him," says Robert Allenby. "Tim's used a long putter since he was a kid, so it's definitely a career-changing move for him." Robert Garrigus, who like Allenby uses a conventional-length putter, adds, "I'm fully on Tim Clark's side and the side of all the guys who use anchored putters. It's our livelihood, not the USGA's."

Clark appreciates the support, but he recognizes that the players are not unanimous in their opposition to 14-1b. Woods, for one, has stated that a motion with a belly or long putter doesn't constitute a stroke. Asked if he's genuinely concerned that the new rule will end his career, Clark nods vigorously. "Oh, 100 percent. It's not a nice feeling coming out here every week knowing there are people trying to take my livelihood away."

That said, he's not looking for the kind of attention that Martin got a decade ago when the Supreme Court upheld the disabled tour pro's right to use a cart. "I don't want to be portrayed as too much of a victim," Clark says. "I'm still playing out here; I'm still trying to win."

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