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THE MAIL
June 10, 2013
Ricardo Portillo's death was a senseless tragedy (The Beautiful Game, Turned Ugly). Even more tragic are the words of his killer, José Domingo Téran, when he asks why God allowed his hands to become those of the devil. This reflects an increasing problem in our society: the constant effort to find someone or something else to take the blame instead of accepting responsibility.
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June 10, 2013

The Mail

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Ricardo Portillo's death was a senseless tragedy (The Beautiful Game, Turned Ugly). Even more tragic are the words of his killer, José Domingo Téran, when he asks why God allowed his hands to become those of the devil. This reflects an increasing problem in our society: the constant effort to find someone or something else to take the blame instead of accepting responsibility.

Jack M. Rode, Whitefield, N.H.

Leaders of the Pack

Lars Anderson thinks IndyCar races were predictable, follow-the-leader, parade-style runs (SCORECARD)? I think that more accurately describes what the races on the NASCAR speedways had become over the last decade. Take the Daytona 500. Before last season, a car almost always had to be pushed or drafted by a competitor's car to have a shot at finishing first. Now with the return of pack racing, drivers have to constantly try to avoid the "big one" crash that is almost a given when the cars are traveling practically on top of one another at upward of 150 mph.

Ron Rose, Peoria, Ariz.

The Djoker

L. Jon Wertheim is absolutely right. Novak Djokovic is neither Roger Federer nor Rafael Nadal (SCORECARD), which is precisely why fans have come to embrace Djokovic as the new king of men's tennis. The Roger-Rafa rivalry became so robotic and redundant, even they began to look bored when facing each other. Djokovic has added some much-needed spice to the top of the rankings, and his sense of humor, stellar play and emergence as the best closer have been a welcome addition to the ATP World Tour.

Carla S. Curtsinger, New York City

The Ice Man

While I enjoyed Austin Murphy's article about hockey in the Golden State (California Dreamin' ...), he overlooked one important detail: Frank Zamboni and his nifty ice-resurfacing machine. Frank invented the Zamboni in Paramount, Calif., and they have been manufactured there since 1949.

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