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November 19, 1956 | Volume 5, Issue 21

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 Cover - Sports Illustrated November 19, 1956

November 19, 1956
Del Miller, affable trainer-driver who developed Adios into $500,000 prize package, was in sulky as speedy Dottie's Pick hustled mile in 1:57 4/5, fastest ever for mares, to win $75,000 American...

November 19, 1956
FOOTBALLTennessee, Oregon State, Iowa and Texas Aggies were week's biggest winners in college ranks (see page 24) while New York, Chicago Bears and Washington stole show in NFL (see page 104).

November 19, 1956
Clowning dodger Gil Hodges, out of his usual quiet character, draws loud yaks and wide grins from Japanese schoolboys with his caricature of an outfielder climbing the wall at Osaka.

November 19, 1956
AUTO RACINGMarvin Panch, Charlotte, N.C., NASCAR 150-m. grand natl. stock car race, in 1:54.26, in 1956 Ford, Willow Springs, Calif.

November 19, 1956 | Don Parker
With only two—or, in some cases, three—weeks remaining of the 1956 collegiate football schedule the champions are apparent in most of the six major areas of the country. Tennessee, with its...

November 19, 1956 | Don Parker
Best bowl bets. Rose Bowl: Iowa vs. Oregon State; Orange Bowl: Colorado vs. Ciemson; Gator Bowl: Syracuse vs. Florida.

November 19, 1956 | Don Parker
For games of Saturday, Nov. 17

November 19, 1956 | Tex Maule
EASTERN CONFERENCE

November 19, 1956
4—Tony Triolo22—A.P.23—I.N.P. (2), Herald-Sun, U.P.25—Earl Seubert-Minneapolis Tribune26, 27—Ken McLaughlin-San Francisco Chronicle, Al Panzera-Ft. Worth Star-Telegram, Jim Lapham-Kansas City...

November 19, 1956
The best-dressed team we've ever sent to an Olympiad wears uniforms donated by American manufacturers

November 19, 1956 | Joel Sayre

November 19, 1956 | Sam Snead
The scoring in golf, as everyone knows, is done around the greens. Even our finest golfers don't hit all the greens—a number of our top-circuit scorers miss quite a few—but they can get down in...

November 19, 1956 | Fred R. Smith
The frost is on the fairway and the golfer stays at home. He's in the den, polishing up his game

November 19, 1956 | Ajay
[This article consists of illustations see below.]

November 19, 1956
FOOTBALL: THE MANIKINSSirs:Please tell me where I could get a set of the manikins you used to demonstrate the Oklahoma-Notre Dame game (A New Perspective, SI, Oct. 29).JOHN BARRETTDetroit

November 19, 1956
This determined band of athletes faces possibly the toughest trial of any U.S. team at Melbourne. Superiority in field hockey has been pre-empted for decades by Europeans and Asians, most...

November 19, 1956
[TV]TV [COLOR TV]COLOR TV [NETWORK RADIO]NETWORK RADIO

November 19, 1956
Thus, last week—in the Magyar version of hip, hip, hooray—the Hungarians were welcomed to Australia. Their salute can stand as the world's salute to the whole assemblage of human skill and...

November 19, 1956
Athletes of 74 nations were expected in Melbourne. At week's end it appeared that those of all but five would be present.

November 19, 1956 | Lee Griggs
The time is here when New Year's Day and its bowl games are uppermost in the minds of the country's best football teams and their ardent supporters, so Saturday was a day of climax among...

November 19, 1956 | Lee Griggs
Georgia TechIowaMiamiMichigan StateMinnesotaOhio StateOklahomaOregon StateSyracuseTennesseeTexas A&M

November 19, 1956

November 19, 1956
•Off with the New, On with the OldDon't be surprised if there is a return next fall to the system of "split" squads of football officials in intersectional games instead of the present system (a...

November 19, 1956 | Lincoln Barnett
One summer afternoon in the fifth century B.C. a naked youth stood reverently in the temple of Zeus at Olympia and received on his head an olive wreath in token of his victory in the ancient...

November 19, 1956 | Lincoln Barnett
In the golden age of Greece, about 500 B.C., athletics had its finest hour in the Olympic Games. There, before spectators of their own sex, the flower of young Greek manhood competed in the...

November 19, 1956 | Lincoln Barnett
The modern Olympics, like the old, have given rise to a legion of heroes, and a man reviewing their performances inclines to the feeling that the great Olympians, though they competed in different...

November 19, 1956 | Harry Phillips
To Henry Romney, Assistant to the Managing Editor and head of our Letters Department, one clear fact about SPORTS ILLUSTRATED is that our reading audience is a vital part, both as spectator and...

November 19, 1956 | Coles Phinizy

November 19, 1956
The men and women of track and field who come to the Olympics from more than 50 countries are already rich in the coin of amateurism, the winner's medal. They are now at Melbourne in quest of the...

November 19, 1956 | Roy Terrell

November 19, 1956 | Roy Terrell
When U.S. athletes move into Melbourne for the XVI Olympiad, some of the foreign competitors they encounter will not seem foreign at all; they will seem like old friends—and, of course, they will...

November 19, 1956
Women are relative newcomers to the Olympic track and field program, first appearing at the 1928 Games in Amsterdam, where they performed feats that were incredible by those days' standards....

November 19, 1956

November 19, 1956 | Coles Phinizy

November 19, 1956 | Coles Phinizy
In recent years a growing foreign legion of swimmers, as well as trackmen (see page 55), from every continent have been coming to study and compete in the U.S. The four swimmers pictured below are...

November 19, 1956
At every Olympics, track and field is the classic on the main stage, but never the be-all and end-all of the Games. Before the Olympic flag is run down at Melbourne, the performers of swimming and...

November 19, 1956 | Jimmy Jemail
AVERELL HARRIMANGovernor of New YorkNot if we are to follow the original ideals of the Olympics. These glorify the athlete, not his country. All nations should unite in honoring the winner. Isn't...

November 19, 1956
In weight lifting, as in almost every physical contest, a good big man is better than a good little man. The best big man to ever participate in the Iron Game, which is as much a trial of mental...

November 19, 1956
A split second after the call to "ready all?" the cream of the eight-oared shells will hit the catch, the 1¼-mile course at Lake Wendouree, Ballarat. Less than six minutes later, the U.S.,...

November 19, 1956
When the Olympic sailing events get under way off Melbourne on Port Phillip Bay, the 5.5-meter class will be the top boat. In 1952 Dr. Britton Chance of Philadelphia took that gold medal,...

November 19, 1956
There is no professional boxing in Russia or Poland, which means there are no astrakhan-collared Carbos manipulating in Leningrad hotel rooms or lingering over glasses of tea with Muscovite...

November 19, 1956
Russian marksmen have since 1952 dominated the international shooting scene, and they are expected to carry off most of the honors at this Olympics. Though Sweden, Norway, Finland and Hungary have...

November 19, 1956
In theory, the entire program of the Olympic Games is designed for all the nations of the world. In actual practice, however, some nations have turned out to be downright selfish. India, for...

November 19, 1956
Experts who have seen it say the 333-meter cycling track at Melbourne compares favorably with the good tracks of Europe. A race-track tout can safely predict some fast times in the Games, but it...

November 19, 1956
Twenty-five years ago Hungary ruled international water polo with a zone type of play that put a premium on ball handling. In off-Olympic years the U.S. played different rules in what amounted to...

November 19, 1956
Soccer is the most universally popular sport on the Melbourne agenda, but as an Olympic event it is sick and suffering from estranged love. The reason: professional teams. A year ago 37 countries...

November 19, 1956
Casting an expert eye at Britain's select team last month, 67-year-old Arnold Hands, a peer among the world's field hockey coaches, announced, "We can win the hockey at Melbourne." Coach Hands...

November 19, 1956
At the 1955 world fencing championships Hungary proved that both its old blood and its new blood was anything but sluggish. The Hungarian men and women won five of the eight titles: the individual...

November 19, 1956
Gymnastic champions are made very slowly, and the old order yields very slowly to the new. Upsets are a rarity. Gymnastic experts in Russia, Japan and the U.S. concur on the probable outcome of...

November 19, 1956
The Europeans will paddle off with most of the medals in the canoe and kayak races. But the United States will cop the toughest of all, the 10,000-meter single-blade canoe event.

November 19, 1956
Amateur wrestling in the United States is a neglected and misunderstood sport whose followers are probably outnumbered by cat-show enthusiasts. Yet, with 16 gold medals to be won, it ranks second...

November 19, 1956
Behind the modern pentathlon lies a real military purpose, which explains why it has so long been dominated by military men. The pentathlon is actually a test of five skills that a mounted courier...

November 19, 1956 | Roger Bannister

November 19, 1956 | Harry Cox
A modern village, complete down to shoe repair shops, and a cosmopolitan menu off 5,000 dishes await athletes at Melbourne's 'best-catered Games in history'