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September 30, 1968 | Volume 29, Issue 14

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Harry Edwards Cover - Sports Illustrated September 30, 1968

September 30, 1968 | Peter Carry
AMERICAN LEAGUE

September 30, 1968 | Peter Carry
Because the Giants were facing St. Louis' Bob Gibson, who has been so stingy about allowing runs this season (1.16 ERA with 12 shutouts) that he is almost sure to set a record for earned run...

September 30, 1968
BASKETBALL—The Chicago Bulls are trying out ZVONIMIR PETRICEVIC, hero of Yugoslavia in a 1964 victory over the Russian basketball team—a game in which he scored 44 points. The 7', 288-pound center...

September 30, 1968
Marlin McPhail, a versatile 8-year-old from Norwichtown, Conn., in a 12-day period won a junior golf tournament, took five swimming events in dual meets and two firsts in a sectional championship,...

September 30, 1968
Cover—Eric Schweikardt, James Drake, Davila Arellano, Yves Debraine—LIFE, Ted Streshinsky-Pix6—Tony Triolo21—Tony Tomsic22—Roy DeCarava, Harry Cabluck, Walter Iooss Jr.23—James Drake24—John D....

September 30, 1968
PICKS AND PECKSSirs:I think that the Dallas Cowboys are the greatest, and I have never seen you or anyone else cover a subject better (Pro Football, Sept. 16). My hand is extended to Tex Maule and...

September 30, 1968
THE TRACK MESS

September 30, 1968
•Bobby Mitchell, veteran Washington Redskin flanker, explaining what bothers him most about his new role as a bench warmer: "The things that people don't say to me."

September 30, 1968 | Tex Maule

September 30, 1968 | William Leggett

September 30, 1968 | William Johnson

September 30, 1968 | John Underwood

September 30, 1968
Notre Dame confronts Purdue at South Bend, and the clash of these two fierce rivals may decide who is No. 1. Dan Jenkins reports a game that will shape the season.

September 30, 1968
In the Olympics, as in the world, the dominant forces are the U.S. and the Soviet Union. One or the other will "win" the Olympics—that is, capture the most medals, raise its national flag the most...

September 30, 1968 | Garry Valk
This issue contains a rich and fairly complex variety of major stories—a look at pro football's young quarterbacks (page 20), an analysis of the upcoming World Series (page 26), our quadrennial...

September 30, 1968
[This article contains a table. Please see hardcopy of magazine or PDF.]

September 30, 1968
Gypsy Rose Lee left burlesque "because I found something better to do, and almost anything is." She is now touring the nation promoting dog food. The product is called Voila Gourmet Dog Food, and...

September 30, 1968 | Pat Putnam
Ron Sellers, Florida State's fine pass catcher, looks too thin and scatter-limbed, but opponents reveal his true value by triple-teaming him. As Maryland found out, even that is often not enough

September 30, 1968 | Mervin Hyman

September 30, 1968 | Mervin Hyman
THE BACK: O.J. Simpson of USC gained 236 yards rushing, caught six passes for 57 yards, returned kicks for 72 yards and scored four times, twice in the fourth quarter, as the Trojans battled from...

September 30, 1968 | Curry Kirkpatrick
At the PGA Team Championship in Oklahoma City the two kings got all the chuckles but Bobby Nichols and George Archer won the money

September 30, 1968 | Pat Ryan
So it appears to Pilot Louis Mancuso, who made the swap that turned him into an owner of a classic colt, and to Billy Haughton, who drove Rum Customer and became a million-dollar winner for the...

September 30, 1968 | John Underwood

September 30, 1968 | Gwilym S. Brown
In recent years Author Ron Clarke has been so busy setting pen to paper that it is a wonder Distance Runner Ron Clarke ever has time to set spike to track. In 1966 Author Clarke (a real pro who...

September 30, 1968 | Felicia Lee
In 1958, when Parachutes Incorporated opened its first sport-parachuting school, earthbound skeptics predicted that the apparently suicidal sport of sky diving would never get off the ground. Now,...

September 30, 1968 | Frank Sleeper
As far as Pitcher Cy Young and Catcher Lou Criger knew, the season of 1903 was all over and it was time to go home. Then the Boston manager phoned and the first (unofficial) World Series was on